nevada historical markers

#224 - KYLE (KIEL) RANCH

location: inside Kiel Ranch off W Carey Ave & Kiel Way, Las Vegas
Established by Conrad Kiel in 1875, this was one of the only two major ranches in Las Vegas Valley throughout the 19th century. The Kiel tenure was marked by violence. Neighboring rancher Archibald Stewart was killed in a gunfight here in 1884. Edwin and William Kiel were found murdered on the ranch in October 1900.
The San Pedro, Los Angeles and Salt Lake Railroad purchased the ranch in 1903 and later sold it to Las Vegas banker John S. Park, who built the elegant white mansion. Subsequent owners included Edwin Taylor (1924-39), whose cowboy ranch hands competed in national rodeos, and Edwin Losee (1939-58), who developed the Boulderado Dude Ranch here, a popular residence for divorce seekers.
In the late 1950's, business declined and the ranch was sold. In 1976, 26 acres of the original ranch were purchased jointly by the City of North Las Vegas and its Bicentennial Committee as a historic project.


personal note: Some point between 2009 and Feb 2021, this marker lost its blue Nevada shape and just became a plaque on the gate of the park. A fire in 1992 destroyed the main building. The city then sold off all but 7 acres of this historic park. It was used as a dump site, losing its value as an archeological site. When I visited last week, the park was a disaster. There are giant cut branches everywhere. Couldn’t even see the spring. Las Vegas fails at preserving history once again.



Deep in the heart of the golden west, home means nevada to me

The Nevada State Historical Marker Program was launched in 1964 for Nevada's centennial to commemorate events such as the Old Spanish Trail in Southern Nevada and the great train robbery in Verdi, west of Reno.
These roadside markers bring attention to the places, people, and events that make up Nevada’s heritage. They are as diverse as the counties they are located within and range from the typical mining boom and bust town to the largest and most accessible petroglyph sites in Northern Nevada.
I started visiting the markers around my city during quarantine and I found that I enjoyed learning about the history of the land. I've almost seen all of the ones that are in my city and I hope to one day be able to visit more of the rural locations.
It's almost like a treasure hunt because you never know if the marker is going to still be standing in the original location or not. Over the years, the State Historic Preservation Office has decommissioned some markers because vandalism persists at certain sites or because marking some locations no longer seems appropriate for various reasons.
Thank you to Nevada Department of Transportation which has contributed considerable funding to maintain the markers for the last decade.

Other Important Sites:

Nevada State Historical Preservation Office || Nevada Landmarks's List || A Guide To Nevada's Historical Markers

271

The number of markers in the Nevada system.

15

The number of markers I have seen.

256

The number of markers I still need to see day.