nevada historical markers

#41 - PUEBLO GRANDE DE NEVADA

location: SR 169 Near Simplot Road, Overton
Indians of a highly developed civilization lived throughout Moapa Valley from 300-1100 A.D. Several hundred ancient pithouses, campsites, rockshelters, salt mines and caves of Puebloan people make up what is commonly known as "Lost City." These people cultivated corn, beans and squash in fields irrigated by river water. They also gathered wild seeds and fruits and hunted widely for deer, antelope, desert bighorn sheep, small mammals and birds. They wove fine cotton cloth, fired beautifully painted and textured pottery and mined and traded salt and turquoise to coastal tribes for seashells. Early dwellings were circular pithouses below ground; later dwellings above ground were single-story adobes having up to 100 rooms.
Lake Mead, created by Hoover Dam, flooded the most intensively developed portion of Lost City.


personal note: Isn't it a little depressing how we will flood and destroy places we later deem historic... An important comment was made when I posted this sign on it's own about how the words of the sign may be considered offensive or inaccurate.







Deep in the heart of the golden west, home means nevada to me

The Nevada State Historical Marker Program was launched in 1964 for Nevada's centennial to commemorate events such as the Old Spanish Trail in Southern Nevada and the great train robbery in Verdi, west of Reno.
These roadside markers bring attention to the places, people, and events that make up Nevada’s heritage. They are as diverse as the counties they are located within and range from the typical mining boom and bust town to the largest and most accessible petroglyph sites in Northern Nevada.
I started visiting the markers around my city during quarantine and I found that I enjoyed learning about the history of the land. I've almost seen all of the ones that are in my city and I hope to one day be able to visit more of the rural locations.
It's almost like a treasure hunt because you never know if the marker is going to still be standing in the original location or not. Over the years, the State Historic Preservation Office has decommissioned some markers because vandalism persists at certain sites or because marking some locations no longer seems appropriate for various reasons.
Thank you to Nevada Department of Transportation which has contributed considerable funding to maintain the markers for the last decade.

Other Important Sites:

Nevada State Historical Preservation Office || Nevada Landmarks's List || A Guide To Nevada's Historical Markers

271

The number of markers in the Nevada system.

15

The number of markers I have seen.

256

The number of markers I still need to see day.