nevada historical markers

#115 - POTOSI

location: Mt Potosi Canyon Road off Nevada State Route 160
The desire of the Mormon settlements for economic self-sufficiency led to mining by missionaries for lead. In 1856 Nathaniel V. Jones was sent to recover ore from the "Mountain of Lead" 30 miles southwest of the mission at Las Vegas Springs. About 9,000 pounds were recovered before smelting difficulties forced the remote mine to be abandoned in 1857. Potosi became the first abandoned mine in Nevada.
In 1861 California mining interests reopened the mine, and a smelter and rock cabins of 100 busy miners made up the mining camp of Potosi. Even more extensive operations resulted after the transcontinental Salt Lake and San Pedro R.R. (now Union Pacific) was built through the county in 1905.
During World War I, Potosi was an important source of zinc.


personal note:This was one of the first markers that I actually got to see on that trip because the other two were "missing". We travelled down the dirt road for a little bit, but we saw signs that said not to stop at all so we eventually turned around. There looks to be a boy scout retreat up on the mountain, as well as backroads into Goodsprings.




Deep in the heart of the golden west, home means nevada to me

The Nevada State Historical Marker Program was launched in 1964 for Nevada's centennial to commemorate events such as the Old Spanish Trail in Southern Nevada and the great train robbery in Verdi, west of Reno.
These roadside markers bring attention to the places, people, and events that make up Nevada’s heritage. They are as diverse as the counties they are located within and range from the typical mining boom and bust town to the largest and most accessible petroglyph sites in Northern Nevada.
I started visiting the markers around my city during quarantine and I found that I enjoyed learning about the history of the land. I've almost seen all of the ones that are in my city and I hope to one day be able to visit more of the rural locations.
It's almost like a treasure hunt because you never know if the marker is going to still be standing in the original location or not. Over the years, the State Historic Preservation Office has decommissioned some markers because vandalism persists at certain sites or because marking some locations no longer seems appropriate for various reasons.
Thank you to Nevada Department of Transportation which has contributed considerable funding to maintain the markers for the last decade.

Other Important Sites:

Nevada State Historical Preservation Office || Nevada Landmarks's List || A Guide To Nevada's Historical Markers

271

The number of markers in the Nevada system.

15

The number of markers I have seen.

256

The number of markers I still need to see day.